Biological responses to cationically charged phosphorylcholine-based materials in vitro

Rose, S.F., Lewis, A.L., Hanlon, G.W. and Lloyd, A.W. (2004) Biological responses to cationically charged phosphorylcholine-based materials in vitro Biomaterials, 25 (21). pp. 5125-5135. ISSN 0142-9612

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Phosphorylcholine (PC)-based polymers have been used in a variety of medical device applications to improve biocompatibility. The use of PC-based materials for biomaterials is associated with low protein adsorption, reduced complement activation, low inflammatory response and cell adhesion. For some medical device applications however, materials that support cell adhesion are also beneficial, allowing host interaction and encouraging full incorporation within the body. As previous studies have suggested that cell adhesion to materials is enhanced by the addition of charge, PC-based polymers have therefore been modified to incorporate various concentrations of cationic charge. In this study, the affect of cationic charge on a range of biological responses was investigated. In vitro assays have been used to assess the adsorption of protein onto the materials surface, the adhesion of mouse fibroblasts and rabbit corneal epithelial cells and the adhesion of human mononuclear cells and granulocytes. The results corroborate previous work showing that PC without charge significantly reduces protein adsorption, cell adhesion and inflammatory cell activation. The addition of cationic charge to PC polymers however, resulted in an increase in all of the above responses. This increase did not however, increase linearly with cationic monomer concentration. The differences in cell adhesion are discussed in terms of differences in protein adsorption, cytotoxicity and/or stability of the different cationic polymer coatings.

Item Type: Journal article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Phosphorylcholine; Protein adsorption; Inflammatory response; Cell adhesion; Cytotoxicity
Subjects: C000 Biological and Biomedical Sciences > C700 Molecular Biology, Biophysics and Biochemistry
B000 Health Professions
DOI (a stable link to the resource): 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2003.12.016
Faculties: Faculty of Science and Engineering > School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences > Biomedical Materials
Faculty of Science and Engineering > School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences
Depositing User: editor spbs
Date Deposited: 29 Nov 2006
Last Modified: 12 Nov 2013 15:31
URI: http://eprints.brighton.ac.uk/id/eprint/590

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year