A comparative analyses of microstructures from Late Jurassic diamictic units, near Helmsdale, northeast Scotland and a Pleistocene diamicton from near Milton, southern Ontario, Canada – a differential diagnostic method of sediment typing using micromorphology

Menzies, John and Whiteman, Colin (2009) A comparative analyses of microstructures from Late Jurassic diamictic units, near Helmsdale, northeast Scotland and a Pleistocene diamicton from near Milton, southern Ontario, Canada – a differential diagnostic method of sediment typing using micromorphology Netherlands Journal of Geosciences, 88 (1). pp. 75-94. ISSN 0016-7746

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Abstract

Micromorphology is used to examine and compare a Late Jurassic diamictite from northeast Scotland with a Pleistocene diamict from southern Ontario, Canada in order to test if a statistical difference between diamicts can be recognized and used to separate differing types of diamicts/ diamictites. The diamictites from Scotland have been ascribed to various depositional agencies occurring in several distinctly differing terrestrial and marine palaeoenvironments. In contrast, the Pleistocene diamicton is regarded as a subglacial till. Both diamicts appear remarkably similar visually and contain many corresponding features such as macrostructures, and exotic and fractured subangular to subrounded clasts. Micromorphology is used to re-examine these diamicts/diamictites at the microscopic level to detect if the palaeoenvironments within which they were deposited can be ascertained. In this paper a quantitative assessment of microstructures using micromorphology is developed. Comparative statistical analyses of these diamicts, using micromorphological features, reveals that the Jurassic diamictites are non-glacigenic, non-terrestrial and most likely deposited within a marine environment as a result of subaquatic debris mass movement, while, in contrast, the Pleistocene diamicts were most likely subglacial tectomicts deposited beneath the active base of the Laurentide Ice Sheet.

Item Type: Journal article
Uncontrolled Keywords: diamictites; diamictons; diamicts; till; micromorphology; Jurassic; conglomerates; Pleistocene; statistical analyses
Subjects: F000 Physical Sciences > F600 Geology
Faculties: Faculty of Science and Engineering > School of Environment and Technology > Applied Geosciences
Faculty of Science and Engineering > School of Environment and Technology
Depositing User: Dr Colin Whiteman
Date Deposited: 08 Apr 2009
Last Modified: 13 Feb 2014 15:18
URI: http://eprints.brighton.ac.uk/id/eprint/5630

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