The impact of match importance and gender on the team-serving attributional bias among interdependent sports team players

Greenlees, I., Stopforth, M., Graydon, J., Thelwell, R., FILBY, WILLIAM and El-Hakim, Y. (2007) The impact of match importance and gender on the team-serving attributional bias among interdependent sports team players Group Dynamics-Theory Research and Practice, 11 (1). pp. 54-65. ISSN 1089-2699

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

This study examined the team-serving attributional bias (TSAB), and moderators of this bias, in sports team players. The authors predicted that, in line with a motivational explanation for TSABs, members of successful teams would make more internal, stable, and controllable attributions than would members of unsuccessful teams, but only after an important match. The authors also examined the impact of gender. After a competitive match, 528 athletes completed a Causal Dimension Scale for Teams and measures of perceived success and match importance. A series of hierarchical multiple regressions indicated that perceptions of success were positively associated with stable, internal, and externally controllable attributions. The authors also found that stability attributions were moderated by gender and match importance, with perceptions of success being positively associated with stable attributions for males regardless of match importance but positively associated with stable attributions only for those females who perceived the match to be important. The results, therefore, provide support for the use of TSABs within sports teams but also indicate that their use may be moderated by gender and match importance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

Item Type: Journal article
Uncontrolled Keywords: gender; sports team players; sport and exercise science
Subjects: C000 Biological and Biomedical Sciences > C600 Sport and Exercise Science
C000 Biological and Biomedical Sciences > C800 Psychology > C810 Applied Psychology
C000 Biological and Biomedical Sciences > C800 Psychology > C810 Applied Psychology > C813 Sport and Exercise Psychology
Faculties: Faculty of Education and Sport > Chelsea School
Depositing User: Converis
Date Deposited: 08 May 2008
Last Modified: 27 Nov 2013 08:59
URI: http://eprints.brighton.ac.uk/id/eprint/4814

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year