Sensationalists United? Football hooliganism and the English press

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Steen, Robert (2015) Sensationalists United? Football hooliganism and the English press Sport in Society: Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics, 19 (2). pp. 267-279. ISSN 1743-0437

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Abstract

In the course of researching the Heysel tragedy and its coverage by the media [see Interwoven Tragedies companion piece for Sport in Society], I pored over dozens of valuable dissections of football hooliganism by renowned sociologists, almost all of whom charged journalists with both exaggerating and exacerbating the problem. Interviews with the accused, unaccountably, were conspicuous by their absence. These scholarly explorations were also accompanied, in my reading, by a widespread tendency to diminish the havoc wrought by criminal and profoundly antisocial behaviour. Many contributory factors were commonly cited, such as ‘frustrated maleness’, high unemployment, Margaret Thatcher’s declaration that ‘there is no such thing as society’ and the excesses of a small, entirely unrepresentative minority. The prime scapegoats, instead, have been the media – especially the space-starved, time-pressed daily newspapers, as ever, the most inviting of open goals. Their alleged crimes were wilful, irresponsible hyperbole; in short, sensationalism. Written by a sports journalist and journalism lecturer, this paper addresses whether such stereotyping is justified.

Item Type: Journal article
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Sport in Society: Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics on 11/09/2015, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/17430437.2015.1079012
Subjects: L000 Social Sciences > L300 Sociology > L311 Sport and Leisure
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation > P500 Journalism
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation > P500 Journalism > P590 Journalism not elsewhere classified
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation > P300 Media studies
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation > P300 Media studies > P305 Paper-based media studies
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation > P300 Media studies > P320 Sociology of Media
DOI (a stable link to the resource): 10.1080/17430437.2015.1079012
Depositing User: Converis
Date Deposited: 27 Oct 2015 03:01
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2017 01:38
URI: http://eprints.brighton.ac.uk/id/eprint/14429

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