Following the action: how live bloggers are reimagining the professional ideology of sports journalism

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McEnnis, Simon (2015) Following the action: how live bloggers are reimagining the professional ideology of sports journalism Journalism Practice, 10 (8). pp. 967-982. ISSN 1751-2786

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Abstract

Live sports blogging is a relatively new form of journalism in wide and frequent use by media companies but has received little attention from the academy. This article outlines a study that explored the belief and value system behind live sports blogging to establish whether shifts were taking place within the professional ideology of sports journalism. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 live sports bloggers in the United Kingdom. The study found that live bloggers retained core journalistic values and beliefs of balancing objectivity and subjectivity, immediacy, providing a public service and editorial autonomy. However, live blogging's challenges of immediacy, interactivity and shifting consumption patterns have led to a reimagining of what these concepts mean and the skills and competences required. Live bloggers perceived their role as community builders and mediators of discussion as well as information providers, and this represents a new openness and inclusivity within the occupational base. Participants did not regard these changes to be a dumbing down of standards but rather a paradigm shift towards flattening hierarchies between journalist and audience. The findings suggest live bloggers have shown a greater willingness to adapt than previous research into the migration of sports journalists to digital platforms has found.

Item Type: Journal article
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Journalism Practice 2015, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/17512786.2015.1068130
Uncontrolled Keywords: digital journalism; live blogs; new media; online journalism; professional ideology; sports journalism; sports media; Web 2.0
Subjects: L000 Social Sciences > L300 Sociology > L311 Sport and Leisure
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation > P300 Media studies
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation > P300 Media studies > P304 Electronic Media Studies
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation > P300 Media studies > P320 Sociology of Media
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation > P900 Others in mass communications & documentation > P990 Mass communications & documentation not elsewhere classified
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation > P500 Journalism
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation > P500 Journalism > P510 Factual reporting
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation > P500 Journalism > P590 Journalism not elsewhere classified
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation > P400 Publishing
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation > P400 Publishing > P410 Electronic publishing
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation > P400 Publishing > P420 Multimedia publishing
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation > P400 Publishing > P430 Interactive publishing
P000 Mass Communications and Documentation > P400 Publishing > P490 Publishing not elsewhere classified
DOI (a stable link to the resource): 10.1080/17512786.2015.1068130
Depositing User: Converis
Date Deposited: 29 Sep 2015 03:01
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2017 01:38
URI: http://eprints.brighton.ac.uk/id/eprint/14357

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